Red rain

July 1957, an ordinary day in the state of Kerala, India, people walk down the streets doing their business and it begins to rain. Suddenly, people start to shout and run away and fear. Everything turns into a kind of horror movie because the rain drops, they fall from the sky, are bright red. And this is not a horror movie. It’s all happening for real. Imagine the familiar view outside your window. What if you saw it gradually turn red? The close of people caught in the rain would change the pain. Now, my first thought would be, hey, I should have prepared for the apocalypse. But there’s a logical explanation for the red rain. At first, scientists believe the rainwater was painted red by a meteorite burst. But the next study came up with a different theory. The rain is dyed with spores of algae carried by the wind, the spores mixed with rain clouds. And as a result, we see a beautiful but very frightening picture. Red rain. You may be surprised, but now people are used to this phenomenon. The red rain is common for this region.

White rain

Another type of rain that scared the locals occurred near Washington and Oregon called Milky Rain because of its white color. This phenomenon stumped scientists, and even when they analyzed the rainwater, they couldn’t figure out where it came from. After scratching their heads, they came up with two theories. The wind could bring ash from an active volcano in Russia mixed with the water. It colored the rain white. Or maybe it was caused by dust from a lake in south-central Oregon. What other rain colors are there?

Well, green rain fell near Calcutta in the summer of 2002. It sort of looked like a kind of acid or dangerous liquid. But this rain was harmless. It was composed of flowers and mango pollen. Oh, and there was also one not so great ingredient, bee droppings.

Black rain

Similar rain occurred in Moscow, Russia, only this time the pollen was from Birches. Now, if I went outside and saw it raining black, I’d think the end of the world was coming. But black rain is harmless, too, unless you’re the man who just washed his car.

Black rain is caused by a mix of volcanic or even cosmic dust in the water. So now your car is covered in either dust particles that have been inside our planet for millions of years or dust that’s been flying through space and may be older than our entire solar system. Well, you’re still going to have to pay for the car wash, though. One day,

Brown rain

a brown rain fell in southern Russia. The locals were very worried and suspected factories were polluting the air with harmful substances. But after researching the brown rainwater, it turned out that dust was again to blame.

Coin rain

This time, it had traveled a really long distance all the way from Africa. But it’s not just colorful rains that can be scary. We’ve all dreamed that money would just fall from the sky, and it actually happened in a Russian city. In 1940, more than 1000 silver coins from a buried treasure were lifted into the air by a strong tornado and then scattered in the small town. The coins date back to the 16th century. Now it’s hard to calculate the total value of this treasure, but it was definitely the most expensive rain in history. Hey, did I say there’s a change in the weather as in coins? Probably better not then.

Diamond rain

But what if diamonds fell from the sky instead of coins? It’s not a fantasy, it’s reality just not on our planet. Diamond ring is quite common on Jupiter and Saturn. Scientists say that large drops could be half an inch in diameter. That’s a pretty big stone for a ring. Diamonds form a great height because of the atmospheric composition and thunderstorms. But these planets are gas giants. So when the diamonds fall, they reach the hot core of the planet, melt and evaporate upwards. The process starts again.

Leaf rain

Sometimes rain can consist of oats, rye, flowers and other planes, for example, in 1869 in the city of Orit, France, it rained oak leaves. The locals were extremely surprised as the weather was quite clear and sunny, but the leaves appeared high in the sky and fell to the ground for some time. The reason for this was a strong tornado that took place in the area six days earlier that ripped the leaves off of oak trees. For those six days, the wind drove the leaves through the air and raised them higher and higher until they fell back to the ground in a leaf rain.

Spider rain

Arachnophobia is the second most common fear in the world, so this rain might scare a huge number of people because instead of water, spiders fell from the sky. Oh, boy. Now, how did the spiders get into the air? Well, they have a habit of climbing to high points, be it a fence or just a tall plant. When they reach the top, they start to release their web. This web is so light that air currents lift the web and spider into the sky. They’re like spidery skydivers, possibly scary skydivers. If you don’t like spiders, if you’re a friend of spiders, though, don’t worry. These spiders aren’t injured in this unusual rain. They land softly and then they go about their way.

Corn rain

Looking to scare you. Around 1982 to 1986, several homes in Evans, Colorado, were covered with corn. One of the locals claim that at least a few tons of corn kernels fell on his yard.More strangely, there were no cornfields in the area that could cause this phenomenon. In 2001, it rained corn husks in Kansas. The local news reported that 20 to 30 inches of corn leaves covered the main streets of the town of this cedar

Fruit rain

fruit rain. It sounds strange, but the people from a small town in England complain that apples fell from the sky for a few minutes. The apples were quite large, but nobody was hurt except for a couple of cars. Naturally, the locals demanded an explanation from meteorologists. They agreed that a powerful wind picked up the apples from a nearby orchard and then dropped them on the town, though some locals were sure the apples had fallen from a passing plane.

What about nonfood rain? In 1969, a very unusual hailstorm hit the Florida coast. Not only was the hail the size of golf balls, they were literally golf balls. As reported in the news, dozens and dozens and dozens of golf balls fell from the sky. Such hail can cause serious injuries and damage, but fortunately, no one was hurt. This phenomena was not a mystery. The area is full of golf courses as well as strong winds that could lift the balls up and then scatter them back to the ground.

Unusual hailstorm

What about nonfood rain? In 1969, a very unusual hailstorm hit the Florida coast. Not only was the hail the size of golf balls, they were literally golf balls. As reported in the news, dozens and dozens and dozens of golf balls fell from the sky. Such hail can cause serious injuries and damage, but fortunately, no one was hurt. This phenomena was not a mystery. The area is full of golf courses as well as strong winds that could lift the balls up and then scatter them back to the ground.

The most beautiful rain

But it’s possible the most beautiful rain you can see is a meteor shower. Despite its name, it’s completely harmless. These rains happen very often and you can see them at a certain point in the night sky. There are about 112 meteor showers in total over the year, like the Alpha Centauri adds meteor shower with a peak of about three meteors an hour. But the most prolific of these phenomenon is the Orion Yds meteor shower. It’s associated with Halley’s Comet and usually occurs in October or early November. In some years, meteors may occur at rates of 50 to 70 per hour.

Watermelon snow

And hey, it’s not just rain that can be unusual, snow falls from the sky, too, and it can be strange like watermelon snow, you can find it high in the mountains and coastal polar areas of our planet. It’s a type of cold weather algae that gives the snow its pink color. Finally, just remember not to eat the yellow kind of snow. Really.

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